Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Guide Report: San Ignacio Lagoon February 16, 2016

Guide Report
Campo Cortez, San IgnacioLagoon
By:  Rodrigoro Manterola
Week 2
The song remains the same…
Although most of the gray whale sounds are not audible for us humans due to the frequency (lower frequency sounds) they, like all cetaceans, have a complex communication system. Blue whales songs can travel across the ocean while humpback whales songs are amongst some of the most complex communication systems in the whole animal kingdom, including us.
Communication can take place anytime, anywhere. And also, communication takes any form; like us, whales don’t narrow their communication to just sounds; we normally use our body just as much as our words to transmit an idea.
Whales can display a long list of body language and gestures to communicate; breaching, fluke slaps and other behaviors are forms of communication too but what they mean it is still uncertain.
To my understanding sound is the fabric of the universe as vibrations mold the physical world we live in. The brains of dolphins and whales have evolved to master sounds, odontoceti  developed echolocation to perceive the world around them, find food and, as recent studies also mention, to transmit information between individuals.
Mysticeti on the other hand don’t have such an evolved bio-sonar but their singing tells stories of life and names repeated amongst individuals throughout the ocean.
Campo Cortez is a pallete of sounds and creatures. Coyotes, ospreys and geese paint the air with elaborated s stories from the desert, but sounds go beyond the animal kingdom. The morning winds bring the sounds and smells of the mountains, the afternoon shifts the winds from the west bringing the cool and humid breeze from the ocean while we think of long gone times when only the gray whale roamed these lagoons in their long journeys along the north American shores.

Mangroves in Camp

Osprey and Nest at Camp

Group of White Pelicans

Dolphin Skulls on Beach